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The Day in Transparency 2/1/11

February 1st, 2011 by Melanie Buck · No Comments

Here is Tuesday’s look at transparency-related news items, congressional committee hearings, transparency-related bills introduced in Congress, and transparency-related events

News Roundup:

  • The Senate Ethics Committee appointed Attorney Carol Elder Bruce, a partner at K&L Gates, to serve as special counsel to investigate allegations against Sen. John Ensign (R-NV). (Roll Call $)(Politico)
  • According to the Senate Ethics Committee’s annual statistical report, the committee reviewed 93 allegations in 2010 but dismissed all but four cases without any public action. (Roll Call $)
  • For the first time in a decade, lobbying revenues decreased last year, dropping by $104 million, or 2.9 percent. (Roll Call $)
  • Ranking Member Elijah Cummings is sending letters to many of the same entities that Chairman Issa approached in December, saying that he feels he needs to contact them himself since Republicans have not been willing to share the responses they have received. (Politico)
  • “Web 3.0″ is a term that has been popping up in the state and local government IT communities. While it has not yet been determinatively defined, the general idea is online machine-to-machine communication. (Government Technology)
  • A new study found that while the amount of constituent communication with their representatives has increased, the quality of their outreach has decreased. (Tech President)
  • A new IBM report says that federal agencies face numerous challenges in implementing open government programs based on the lack of research available to guide them. (Federal Computer Week)
  • Charles Barclay, one of the five listed lobbyists for the American Association of Airport Executives, will meet with several Democratic senators to discuss the Federal Aviation Administration reauthorization bill. (Politico)

Relevant committee hearings scheduled for 2/1:

House
  • None.
Senate
  • Homeland Security and Government Affairs: Subcommittee on Contracting Oversight. Hearings to examine improving Federal contract auditing. Tues. 2/1. 2:30pm. Senate Dirksen Building 342.

Relevant bills introduced:

  • S. 237. A bill to amend title 31, United States Code, to enhance the oversight authorities of the Comptroller General, and for other purposes; to the Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs.
  • S. 241. A bill to expand whistleblower protections to non-Federal employees whose disclosures involve misuse of Federal funds; to the Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs.

Transparency events scheduled for 2/1:

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The Day in Sunlight 2/1/2011

February 1st, 2011 by Katie Dixon · No Comments

Here is a look at what happened yesterday on the Sunlight network.

  • Paul Blumenthal began the day with several transparency headlines, including highlighting Egypt’s Washington lobbyists, the specifics of House Rules violations, and more. (Sunlight Foundation Blog)
  • Lisa Rosenberg advocated for real time lobbyist campaign contribution reporting. (Sunlight Foundation Blog)
  • Paul Blumenthal compiled a Socrata database for all contacts reported by the PLM Group, the registered umbrella group lobbying on behalf of Egypt. (Sunlight Foundation Blog)
  • Paul Blumenthal reported that another New York Congressman, Rep. Gregory Meeks, is under investigation by the House Ethics Committee for failing to report one of his wife’s sources of income. (Sunlight Foundation Blog)
  • Paul Blumenthal ended the day highlighting Charlie Rangel’s reflections, criticisms of the Office of Congressional Ethics, and more. (Sunlight Foundation Blog)
  • Take a look at the previous day’s transparency-related news items, congressional committee hearings, transparency-related bills introduced in Congress, and transparency related events. (The Open House Project)

No CommentsTags: openhouseproject

The Day in Transparency 1/31/11

January 31st, 2011 by Melanie Buck · No Comments

Here is Monday’s look at the week’s transparency-related news items, congressional committee hearings, transparency-related bills introduced in Congress, and transparency-related events

News Roundup:

  • The House Ethics Committee is investigating whether Rep. Gregory Meeks (D-NY) failed to include information regarding his spouse’s sources of income on his financial disclosure forms. (Roll Call $)
  • Rep. Rivera (R-FL) is facing additional allegations of questionable ethics. The Associated Press reported that he did not report any details for over a third of the expenses for which he reimbursed himself during his time in the Florida State Legislature, simply calling them “campaign expenses.” (Roll Call $)
  • When the House Ethics Committee dismissed investigations into three lawmakers’ fundraising events last week it stated that previous rulings can set a general standard for unacceptable behavior but they do not set a standard as each individual case has to be considered on its own merits. (Roll Call $)
  • President Obama’s call for Congress to do what the White House has already done and publicly disclose their meetings with lobbyists has caused many to criticize the White House’s own disclosure of meetings with lobbyists to be inadequate. (The Hill)
  • Rep. Charles Rangel (D-NY) reflected on his ethics trial and subsequent censure, discussing Congressional ethics and perception as a whole. (Washington Post)
  • President Barack Obama has named Office of Management and Budget Deputy Jeffrey Zients to lead his government reform initiative. (Politico)
  • Obama administration officials are considering relaxing some Federal Risk and Authorization Management Program (FedRAMP) cloud computing certification security requirements to expedite deployments, after the software industry raised concerns about impractical, one-size-fits-all controls. (Next Gov)
  • The State of the Union media enhancement could signal the beginning of a broader Obama administration plan to further utilize social media to communicate with the public during the second half of his term. (Bloomberg)
  • Senate leaders have reached and announced a gentleman’s agreement where minority Republicans will filibuster fewer bills and nominations while the Democratic majority will give them more chances to offer amendments. (Washington Times)
  • The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) has recently withdrawn several proposed regulations designed to protect workers’ health and safety, causing labor unions to voice concern. (The Hill)
  • The Social Security Administration has responded to President Barack Obama’s call to streamline and improve federal regulation by setting up a new e-mail account for the public to submit ideas. (Federal Computer Week)
  • Protesters rallied outside the annual Koch conference of major conservative donors, claiming that those attending the conference were funneling huge undisclosed donations to promote a political agenda meant to increase their profits at the expense of the average American. (Politico) While the protests were generally peaceful, some demonstrators crossed the street to the entrance of the resort and twenty-five were arrested for trespassing. (Washington Post)
  • The 112th Senate has gotten off to a slow start and there do not appear to be much major legislation on the horizon. (Politico)
  • The City University of New York’s Entrepreneurial Journalism program has designed Localeaks, a website where you can send an anonymous tip or file to over 1,400 newspapers using a single online form. (Read Write Web)
  • Opinion: Brand Niemann, senior data scientist at Semanticommunity.net and former senior enterprise architect and data scientist at the Environmental Protection Agency, suggests solving the problem of archiving federal social media records by encouraging individual employees to be information architects and preservationists for their own information. (Federal Computer Week)

Relevant committee hearings scheduled for 1/31-2/4:

House
  • None.
Senate
  • Homeland Security and Government Affairs: Subcommittee on Contracting Oversight. Hearings to examine improving Federal contract auditing. Tues. 2/1. 2:30pm. Senate Dirksen Building 342.
  • Judiciary. Hearings to examine the constitutionality of the Affordable Care Act. Wed. 2/2. 10:00am. Senate Dirksen Building 226.

Relevant bills introduced:

  • S. 211. A bill to provide for a biennial budget process and a biennial appropriations process and to enhance oversight and performance of the Federal Government; to the Committee on the Budget.
  • S. 219. A bill to require Senate candidates to file designations, statements, and reports in electronic form; to the Committee on Rules and Administration.

Transparency events scheduled for 1/31-2/4

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The Day in Sunlight 1/31/2011

January 31st, 2011 by Katie Dixon · No Comments

Here is a look at what happened recently on the Sunlight network.

  • Paul Blumenthal began the day with several transparency headlines, including the Senate’s vote to end secret holds, the possible New York Times WikiLeaks-esque system, and more. (Sunlight Foundation Blog)
  • Anu Narayanswamy investigated the lobbying history between Egypt and the United States, noting that the country has spent close to $2 million on lobbying and is also one of the foremost recipients of U.S. foreign aid. (Sunlight Foundation Blog)
  • Daniel Schuman assesed the monetary value of a good night’s sleep as the mattress company Sleepy’s announced it will give pillow to freshman members of Congress who sleep in their offices, but noted that the gifts could violate House rules. (Sunlight Foundation Blog)
  • Bill Allison reported that Egypt’s Washington lobbyists helped Egypt’s military and the United State’s defense firms. (Sunlight Reporting Group)
  • Keenan Steiner detailed the House Ethics Committee’s findings that three lawmakers who fundraised around the time of a key House Wall Street regulatory reform vote did not give special access to Wall Street, in contrast to the findings of the Office of Congressional Ethics. (Party Time Blog)
  • Take a look at the previous day’s transparency-related news items, congressional committee hearings, transparency-related bills introduced in Congress, and transparency related events. (The Open House Project)

No CommentsTags: openhouseproject

The Day in Transparency 1/28/11

January 28th, 2011 by Melanie Buck · No Comments

Here is Friday’s look at the week’s transparency-related news items, congressional committee hearings, transparency-related bills introduced in Congress, and transparency-related events

News Roundup:

  • The Senate voted to agree to two changes to the chamber’s rules that would eliminate secret holds on nominations and waive the reading of amendments that have been publicly available for 72 hours. Three other changes regarding filibusters along with other procedures that have been used to block or slow the legislative process were rejected. (Roll Call $)(New York Times)
  • Officials have proposed creating a wiki called ExpertNet to expand the practice of gathering expert advice (which they have done since 1972 under the Federal Advisory Committee Act). (Federal Computer Week) Departments would set up a public consultation on a given topic and distribute their questions about the topic to professional networks to start the discussion. (Federal Computer Week)
  • The money that used to be allocated as earmarks is now shifting from being spent on hometown projects to being distributed through federal contracts and grants. (Politico)
  • Rep. Issa, Chairman of the House oversight committee, has requested details of every FOIA request for federal records made during the last five years to ensure that agencies have responded in a timely and substantive manner. (New York Times)
  • After three weeks of waiting while the Senate leadership negotiated new committee ratios, committee seats have finally been distributed. (Roll Call $)
  • White House Chief of Staff William Daley announced a number of staff changes, including that Jay Carney will replace Robert Gibbs as press secretary. (Roll Call $)(The Hill) The Fast Fix provides five fast facts about the new press secretary. (The Washington Post)
  • Citizens for Responsibility and Ethics in Washington is calling on Rep. Linda Sanchez (D-CA), the new ranking member on the ethics panel, to produce a private Ethics Committee opinion about her decision to share staff with her sister, Rep. Loretta Sanchez (D-CA). (The Hill)
  • Interior Secretary Ken Salazar said his department will issue new ethics rules to shield the department’s scientific work from politics and other outside influences. (Federal Times)
  • The Illinois Supreme Court overturned the appellate court decision and unanimously decided that former White House chief of staff Rahm Emanuel is eligible to stay on Chicago’s mayoral ballot. (Politico)(The Hill)
  • Opinion: Government officials should completely open up the Federal Awardee Performance and Integrity Information System to provide the public with contractors’ past performance evaluations. (Project On Government Oversight)

Relevant committee hearings scheduled for 1/28:

  • None.

Relevant bills introduced:

Senate
  • S. 194. A bill to reduce Federal spending and the deficit by terminating taxpayer financing of presidential election campaigns and party conventions; to the Committee on Finance.
House
  • H.R. 453. A bill to prohibit States from carrying out more than one Congressional redistricting after a decennial census and apportionment, to require States to conduct such redistricting through independent commissions, and for other purposes; to the Committee on the Judiciary.
  • H.R. 455. A bill to protect 10th Amendment rights by providing special standing for State government officials to challenge proposed regulations, and for other purposes; to the Committee on the Judiciary.H.R. 463. A bill to apply the Freedom of Information Act to the Federal National Mortgage Association and the Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation during any period that such entities are in conservatorship or receivership; to the Committee on Financial Services.

Transparency events scheduled for 1/28:

  • None.

No CommentsTags: The Day in Transparency · openhouseproject

The Day in Sunlight 1/28/2011

January 28th, 2011 by Katie Dixon · No Comments

The Day in Sunlight 1/28/2011

Here is a look at what happened yesterday on the Sunlight network.

  • Paul Blumenthal reported that the Senate voted to end the practice of secret holds, which ensures that in the future the names of any senators objecting to a bill or objecting to a bill on behalf of another senator will be published automatically. (Sunlight Foundation Blog)
  • Lisa Rosenberg detailed the Senate Campaign Disclosure Parity Act, introduced by Senators Tester and Cochran, a bill that Sunlight has supported a version of for the past three congresses. (Sunlight Foundation Blog)
  • Paul Blumenthal announced that, according to Roll Call, tax lobbyists started a closed Facebook group entitled “Parade of Tax Lobbyists.” (Sunlight Foundation Blog)
  • Erik Martin, Community Manager at Reddit.com, guest blogged on the tool for transparency Reddit and the potential of the Super PAC Sleuth Project. (Sunlight Foundation Blog)
  • Kaitlin Lee bogged on tax expenditure transparency and the lack of transparency surrounding taxes. (Sunlight Foundation Blog)
  • Ryan Sibley described Senator Scott Brown’s request to the Federal Election Commission to allow him to buy several thousand copies of his own book using campaign committee funds to thank his campaign donors with signed copies. (Sunlight Reporting Group)
  • Tom Lee announced that OpenGovernment has been named a finalist in the Accelerator competition of this years SXSW. (Sunlight Labs Blog)
  • Take a look at the previous day’s transparency-related news items, congressional committee hearings, transparency-related bills introduced in Congress, and transparency related events. (The Open House Project)

No CommentsTags: openhouseproject

The Day in Sunlight 1/27/2011

January 27th, 2011 by Nicko Margolies · No Comments

Here is a look at what happened yesterday on the Sunlight network.

  • Ellen Miller recapped Sunlight Live’s coverage of the 2011 State of the Union. (Sunlight Foundation Blog)
  • Paul Blumenthal began the day with a few transparency headlines, including highlights from the State of the Union, Wall Street Journal’s lawsuit to access data on Medicare, and more. (Sunlight Foundation Blog)
  • John Wonderlich broke down President Obama’s statements on transparency in his State of the Union address. (Sunlight Foundation Blog)
  • Paul Blumenthal reported on the reactions from lobbyists to the State of the Union. (Sunlight Foundation Blog)
  • John Wonderlich commented on The Hill’s story on responses to President Obama’s call during the State of the Union for better lobbying disclosure from Congress. (Sunlight Foundation Blog)
  • Take a look at the previous day’s transparency-related news items, congressional committee hearings, transparency-related bills introduced in Congress, and transparency related events. (The Open House Project)

No CommentsTags: OpenHouse · The Day In Sunlight · openhouseproject

The Day in Transparency 1/27/11

January 27th, 2011 by Melanie Buck · No Comments

Here is Thursday’s look at the week’s transparency-related news items, congressional committee hearings, transparency-related bills introduced in Congress, and transparency-related events

News Roundup:

  • The House Ethics Committee decided to drop investigations into Reps. John Campbell (R-CA), Joseph Crowley (D-NY) and Tom Price (R-GA) regarding their votes on the financial overhaul law. (The Hill)(The New York Times)
  • Speaker Boehner says that the allegations of Rep. Rivera’s ethics violations concern activities that happened before he was elected and do not involve any of his Congressional service. (Roll Call $)
  • Neil Barofsky, the special inspector general of the controversial Troubled Asset Relief Program (TARP), said his office is investigating the potential fraudulent use of TARP money at 64 separate financial institutions. (The Center for Public Integrity)
  • The trial for former House aide Fraser Verrusio regarding public corruption charges over his participation in a 2003 trip to the World Series in New York started Wednesday. (Roll Call $)
  • Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid disagrees with the White House’s stance on earmarks, saying that President Barack Obama needs to “back off.” (Politico)(Washington Post)
  • Daily Kos recently started a weekly State of the Nation poll measuring President Obama’s approval rating and other national atmospherics. In addition to the standard poll numbers, the site will be releasing the raw data as well. (Roll Call $)
  • On Wednesday the House voted to end the taxpayer-funded presidential campaign finance system. (Washington Times)
  • Treasury Secretary Timothy Geithner said that tax reform discussion is in the “first inning” and stressed the importance of lowering corporate tax rates to help businesses compete by leveling the playing field. (The Hill)
  • Despite security concerns, Members say they will maintain the political tradition of holding in-person town hall meetings. (Politico)
  • The annual American Customer Satisfaction Index from the University of Michigan’s Ross School of Business found that while American’s satisfaction with government services has dropped since last year, their satisfaction with government websites has remained unchanged. (Next Gov)
  • Opinion: Senate rules reform is missing the root causes of Senate dysfunction by focusing mainly on secret holds and nominees. (Politico)

Relevant committee hearings scheduled for 1/27:

Senate:

  • Judiciary:  Business meeting to consider S.23, to amend title 35, United States Code, to provide for patent reform, and address judicial nominations.
House:
  • None.

Relevant bills introduced:

  • None.

Transparency events scheduled for 1/27:

No CommentsTags: openhouseproject

The Day in Transparency 1/26/11

January 26th, 2011 by Melanie Buck · No Comments

Here is Wednesday’s look at transparency-related news items, congressional committee hearings, transparency-related bills introduced in Congress, and transparency-related events

News Roundup:

State of the Union:

  • President Obama promised to veto any bill containing earmarks. (The Hill)
  • The president proposed federal funding increases for research and development, but did not provide details as to where this finding would come from. (Next Gov)
  • He also announced plans to “merge, consolidate and reorganize the federal government” as part of a greater initiative to increase the United States’ economic competitiveness. (Federal Times)
  • Tech President designates the speech as the “Geekiest State of the Union Evah.”
  • The New York Times offers an interactive State of the Union seating chart.

In other news:

  • The Senate concludes day one without addressing rule reform, as Members are still trying to come to agreement (Roll Call $).
  • Sen. Udall (D-NM) admits that filibuster reform seems unlikely, and suggests support for the eventual agreement as determined by Senate leadership. (Politico)
  • In its first hearing of the 112th Congress, the Oversight and Government Reform committee will hear from Neil Barofsky, special inspector general for the Troubled Assets Relief Program, or TARP. (Washington Post)
  • Sens. Charles Schumer (NY), vice chairman of the Democratic Conference, and Lamar Alexander (TN), chairman of the Senate Republican Conference, are leading efforts to reach a gentlemen’s agreement that would facilitate the flow of legislative business. (The Hill)
  • As some federal agencies start taking blogging to the next level by providing frequent, rich content that promotes public engagement and transparency, new questions of archiving and cataloging arise. (Federal Computer Week)
  • After an Illinois court ruled that Rahm Emanuel did not meet residency requirements for mayor, the Supreme Court of Illinois ruled that his name should still be placed on the ballot as they rush to rule whether he does in fact meet the requirements. (Roll Call $)(Washington Times)
  • The American Medical Association, the American Hospital Association and Pharmaceutical Research and Manufacturers of America are among many groups that want to weaken or eliminate the Independent Payment Advisory Board out of fear that Medicare cuts will be too severe. (Politico)
  • Former House speaker Newt Gingrich called for the abolition of the Environmental Protection Agency in a Tuesday speech in Iowa. (Politico)
  • Several House Democrats responded hesitantly to President Obama’s call for a five-year freeze on discretionary spending, expressing concern that it could undermine the investments the president says are essential for job creation. (The Hill)
  • Republican National Committee chairman Reince Priebus fired a number of political staffers, following through on his promise to start fresh after the departure of former Chairman Steele. (Politico)
  • Officials at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention have put their social media metrics online to show patterns such as spikes in YouTube views and growth in Twitter followers. (Federal Computer Week)
  • Rep. Raul Grijalva (D-AZ) released documents suggesting that White House officials overruled scientific concerns in releasing a report last summer on what happened to the BP oil spill. (Huffington Post)
  • Facing sever budget cuts, nonprofit advocacy groups are working to protect their programs. (Roll Call $)
  • Former Rep. Billy Tauzin (R-LA) appears to be headed towards the K St. lobbying firm Alston & Bird. (Roll Call $)
  • Opinion: Sens. Cornyn and Hatch urge Congress to pass a balanced-budget amendment.

Relevant committee hearings scheduled for 1/26:

House
  • Oversight and Government Reform Full Committee. On a report from the Special Inspector General for the Troubled Assets on bailouts and the foreclosure crisis. 9:30am. HVC-210 Capitol.
Senate
  • Judiciary: hearings to examine protecting American taxpayers, focusing on accomplishments and ongoing challenges in the fight against fraud. 10:30am. Senate Dirksen Building 226.

Relevant bills introduced:

House

  • H.R. 414. A bill to amend the Internal Revenue Code of 1986 to reform the system of public financing for Presidential elections, and for other purposes; to the Committee on House Administration, and in addition to the Committee on Ways and Means, for a period to be subsequently determined by the Speaker, in each case for consideration of such provisions as fall within the jurisdiction of the committee concerned.
  • H.R. 417. A bill to amend the Internal Revenue Code of 1986 to repeal the expansion of certain information reporting requirements to corporations and to payments for property, to impose a surcharge on high income taxpayers, and for other purposes; to the Committee on Ways and Means.
  • H.R. 423. A bill to amend the Help America Vote Act of 2002 to prevent the addresses of the residences of Members of Congress from appearing on the computerized Statewide voter registration lists required to be maintained by States under such Act, and to permit a Member of Congress who seeks to be a candidate for election for public office in a State to meet any requirement under State law to provide the appropriate election official with the address of the Member’s residence by providing the chief State election official with an affidavit certifying that the Member is a resident of the State; to the Committee on House Administration.
  • H.R. 431. A bill to eliminate automatic pay adjustments for Members of Congress, and for other purposes; to the Committee on House Administration, and in addition to the Committee on Oversight and Government Reform, for a period to be subsequently determined by the Speaker, in each case for consideration of such provisions as fall within the jurisdiction of the committee concerned.
  • H. Res. 52. A resolution electing Members to certain standing committees of the House of Representatives; considered and agreed to.
  • H. Res. 53. A resolution electing certain Members to certain standing committees of the House of Representatives; considered and agreed to.
Senate:
  • S. 7. A bill to reform the Federal tax code; to the Committee on Finance.
  • S. 9. A bill to reform America’s political system and eliminate gridlock that blocks progress; to the Committee on Rules and Administration.S
  • S. 14.  A bill to establish a Commission on Congressional Budgetary Accountability and Review of Federal Agencies; to the Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs.
  • S. 18. A bill to repeal the expansion of information reporting requirements for payments of $600 or more to corporations and for other purposes; to the Committee on Finance.
  • S. 28. A bill to amend the Communications Act of 1934 to provide public safety providers an additional 10 megahertz of spectrum to support a national, interoperable wireless broadband network and authorize the Federal Communications Commission to hold incentive auctions to provide funding to support such a network, and for other purposes; to the Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation.
  • S. 72. A bill to repeal the expansion of information reporting requirements for payments of $600 or more to corporations, and for other purposes; to the Committee on Finance.
  • S. 74. A bill to preserve the free and open nature of the Internet, expand the benefits of broadband, and promote universally available and affordable broadband service; to the Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation.
  • S. 89. A bill to repeal the imposition of withholding on certain payments made to vendors by government entities; to the Committee on Finance.
  • S. 111. A bill to amend the Help America Vote Act of 2002 to require new voting systems to provide a voter-verified permanent record, to develop better accessible voting machines for individuals with disabilities, and for other purposes; to the Committee on Rules and Administration.
  • S. 119. A bill to preserve open competition and Federal Government neutrality towards the labor relations of Federal Government contractors on Federal and federally funded construction projects; to the Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs.
  • S. 130. A bill to prohibit authorized committees and leadership PACs from employing the spouse or immediate family members of any candidate or Federal office holder connected to the committee; to the Committee on Rules and Administration.
  • S. 131. A bill to prohibit the use of stimulus funds for signage indicating that a project is being carried out using those funds; to the Committee on Environment and Public Works.
  • S. 133. A bill to repeal the provision of law that provides automatic pay adjustments for Members of Congress; to the Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs.
  • S. 149. A bill to extend the expiring provisions of the USA PATRIOT Improvement and Reauthorization Act of 2005, the Intelligence Reform and Terrorism Prevention Act of 2004, and the FISA Amendments Act of 2008 until December 31, 2013, and for other purposes; to the Committee on the Judiciary.
  • S. 168. A bill to amend the Help America Vote Act of 2002 to establish standards for the distribution of voter registration application forms and to require organizations to register with the State prior to the distribution of such forms; to the Committee on Rules and Administration.
  • S. 178. A bill to reduce Federal spending by $2.5 trillion through fiscal year 2021; to the Committee on Finance.
  • S. 182. A bill to prohibit the Federal Government from awarding contracts, grants, or other agreements to, providing any other Federal funds to, or engaging in activities that promote the Association of Community Organizations for Reform Now and its shell companies which have been given new names; to the Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs.
  • S.J. Res. 1. A joint resolution proposing an amendment to the Constitution of the United States relative to limiting the number of terms that a Member of Congress may serve; to the Committee on the Judiciary.

Transparency events scheduled for 1/26:

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The Day in Sunlight 1/26/2011

January 26th, 2011 by Nicko Margolies · No Comments

Here is a look at what happened yesterday on the Sunlight network.

  • Ellen Miller announced the Sunlight Live coverage of President Obama’s 2011 State of the Union. (Sunlight Foundation Blog)
  • Paul Blumenthal began the day with a few transparency headlines, including who is sitting with First Lady Michelle Obama in the upper level box seats for the State of the Union, Sunlight’s request for Congress to improve how it makes floor and committee videos available online, and more. (Sunlight Foundation Blog)
  • Nicole Aro published the Local Open Government Directive, born out of CityCamp Colorado to make local government more transparent and accessible. (Sunlight Foundation Blog)
  • Paul Blumenthal highlighted Rick Hasen’s column from Slate on the death of the Federal Election Commission and the slow erosion of campaign finance laws. (Sunlight Foundation Blog)
  • Paul Blumenthal reported on the lobbying that occurs at Davos. (Sunlight Foundation Blog)
  • Paul Blumenthal closed the day with several transparency headlines including Sen. Harry Reid’s rebuttal to earmark talk from President Obama, the food industry vs. First Lady Michelle Obama, and more. (Sunlight Foundation Blog)
  • Josh Hatch broke down the Sunlight Live coverage of the 2011 State of the Union. (Sunlight Reporting Group)
  • Bill Allison reported that the Wall Street Journal is suing for access to data on payments that doctors receive from Medicare. (Sunlight Reporting Group)
  • Keenan Steiner listed some of the pre-State of the Union fundraisers happening on Capitol Hill. (Party Time Blog)
  • Take a look at the previous day’s transparency-related news items, congressional committee hearings, transparency-related bills introduced in Congress, and transparency related events. (The Open House Project)

No CommentsTags: OpenHouse · The Day In Sunlight · openhouseproject